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ILSP Program News and Events

The International Legal Studies core faculty includes respected scholars with expertise in key areas of international law who are frequently called upon by national and international media to comment on current events.

 

Research by Practice Lab students supports ICC case against Sudanese President Al Bashir

Working over several semesters, students in Vanderbilt’s International Law Practice Lab have provided the baseline data for the mappingbashir.org website, which chronicles the travels of Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmad Al Bashir.

Al Bashir faces charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity related to government orchestrated attacks against civilians in Darfur, Sudan. The Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court has presented 27 Reports to the United Nations Security Council regarding the situation, but Bashir has yet to be arrested and continues to travel widely. Students in the International Law Practice Lab have generated the most complete dataset in the world to track Bashir’s travel as well as the legal and political expressions by States in United Nations Security Council debates. Mr. Al-Bashir has taken 173 trips abroad since the issuance of the arrest warrants by ICC judges.

During oral arguments in September 2018 related to Jordan’s refusal to enforce ICC warrants of arrest, Practice Lab students worked overnight to address questions posed by the ICC Appeals Chamber. The Practice Lab also submitted an amicus brief in the case at the request of the Appeals Chamber before the hearings.

Watch Professor Mike Newton participate in the Day 1 of the oral arguments on September 10 (beginning at 1:42:30), Professor Newton’s arguments on Day 3 of the oral arguments on September 12 is here (beginning at 24:55), and Day 4 arguments on September 13 are here (beginning at 1:04:15).

Newton at ICC Appeals Chamber

Professor Michael A. Newton (front row left) in the International Criminal Court Appeals Chamber, The Hague, on June 8, 2018, awaiting the issuance of the Appeals verdict in Prosecutor v. Jean-Pierre Bemba. In a 3-2 decision, the ICC overturned Bemba’s conviction for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Dora Duru ’20 receives Helen Strong Curry International Legal Scholarship Dora Duru '20 receives Helen Strong Curry International Legal Scholarship

Duru is the second recipient of the scholarship endowed through an estate gift from Jean Curry Allen (BA’44), which will be awarded awarded each year to a first-year student who demonstrates strong academic performance and plans to focus their upper-level studies on international law. The scholarship was named in honor of Allen’s mother, Helen Strong Curry. READ MORE

Professor Mike Newton and Oliver Windridge, founder and director of the Mapping Bashir research project, filed a formal request to the Appeals Chamber of the ICC regarding Jordan’s appeal of the arrest and surrender of Omar Al-Bashir.

Global Trade: NAFTA Talks: Off the Rails? - October 16, 2017 - Timothy Meyer , professor of law, is quoted. “Neither Mexico nor Canada nor major elements within the US business community and government want to see NAFTA die.”

Professor Mike Newton with 3L students Pete Bauleke and Kourtney Kinsel With the support of the International Legal Studies Program, 3L students Pete Bauleke and Kourtney Kinsel attended the International Humanitarian Law Dialogues in Chautauqua New York along with Professor Mike Newton from 27 to 29 August. The annual event gathers prosecutors from the extant international war crimes tribunals along with academic experts from around the globe. Ms. Kinsel served as the Rapporteur for the group of prosecutors as they negotiated the Chautauqua Declaration for this, the 11th Dialogues. Mr. Bauleke assisted the members of the Robert H. Jackson Center who ran the event, and conducted a number of interviews related to his pending paper on reforming U.S. human rights legislation as applied to ongoing military operations. Professor Newton led discussion on the use of modern military commissions.

 

Holly Thompson '19

Holly Thompson '19 selected for inaugural class of Douglass Fellows by Human Trafficking Institute

 

 

 

Newton and Leyh

Leyh with students Professor Michael Newton, who serves as a Senior Peace Fellow for the Public International Law & Policy Group, worked with PILPG Senior Counsel Brianne McGonigle Leyh, who was a visiting fellow at VLS, to develop an innovative set of transitional justice simulations during August 2017. Dr. Leyh is an associate professor at Utrect University, where she directs the Utrecht Center for International Studies.  Vanderbilt students field tested the simulations and provided helpful insights for refinements. 

 

The Atlantic: The dangers of arming autocrats - June 13, 2017 - On June 8, while official Washington sat captivated by the testimony of former FBI Director James Comey, a small group of bipartisan senators planned to force a vote on a subject near to official Washington’s heart: arms sales to Saudi Arabia. The article includes a quote from a legal assessment Michael Newton, professor of the practice of law, prepared for the American Bar Association’s Center for Human Rights on the arms sales.

 

The Atlantic: The dangers of arming autocrats - June 13, 2017 - On June 8, while official Washington sat captivated by the testimony of former FBI Director James Comey, a small group of bipartisan senators planned to force a vote on a subject near to official Washington’s heart: arms sales to Saudi Arabia. The article includes a quote from a legal assessment Michael Newton, professor of the practice of law, prepared for the American Bar Association’s Center for Human Rights on the arms sales. 

Ingrid Wuerth, Helen Strong Curry Chair in International Law

Ingrid Wuerth appointed to the newly endowed Helen Strong Curry Chair in International Law

 

 

 


The Siege of Aleppo and War Crimes - The Federalist Society's International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast

Featuring Professor Michael Newton and Emory Law Professor Laurie R. Blank
For months, Syrian and Russian warplanes have bombed Aleppo, killing and wounding residents. Russian officials have referred to the siege as “diplomacy backed by force.”  The US Ambassador to the UN has called it “barbarism.”  The US and France have called for a War Crimes investigation, but any meaningful action at the UN has been blocked by Russia’s place on the Security Council.  In this Teleforum, two distinguished professors with extensive practical experience examined the status of the siege under the Law of Armed Conflict and International Humanitarian Law.

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