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Class of 1973

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(Notes posted in the order they were received, with the newest posts on top.)

William O. Geny died June 1. He was 70. Bill attended Tulane University for his undergraduate degree before earning his law degree from Vanderbilt.  After law school, Bill took a position as a trial attorney in the Patent Section of Justice Department’s Civil Division which he held from 1974 to 1982.  He was responsible for a number of significant cases while working for the Government which added significantly to jurisprudence under 28 USC§1498.  In 1982, he and his wife, Denise E. Geny, moved to Portland Oregon where he joined an intellectual property law firm now known as Chernoff Vilhauer LLP.  Bill retired from the Chernoff firm last year. Bill was an accomplished musician as well as a well-recognized patent attorney. He is survived by his wife, Denise, and four children. Posted 8.17.2017

Judge Patrick L. Woodward has been appointed as Chief Judge of the Court of Special Appeals of Maryland by Governor Larry Hogan. Judge Woodward has served as a judge of the court since 2005. Posted 5.18.17

Allen Cox Dunstan of Memphis died January 5. He was 69. Allen received his undergraduate degree in economics from Vanderbilt before earning his law degree. Upon graduation he returned to Memphis and began his legal career at Evans Petree Cobb and Edwards Law Firm. Over the last 25 years, he was partner at Harkavy Shainberg Haplan and Dunstan Law Firm. He is survived by his daughter Margaret Dunstan, and his partner Judy Parks. Posted 1.23.17

Noel Francis Stahl of Nashville died August 11. He was 68. He earned his BA from Vanderbilt University in 1970, before earning his law degree. He served his country as a captain in the United States Marine Corps Office of the Judge Advocate General from 1973-1977. He was a proud member of the Tennessee Bar Association for 43 years and a Fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers. He is survived by his wife Sandy Page Stahl, three sons, and 7 grandchildren. Posted 8.23.16 

Carol McCoy, Davidson County Chancellor, has announced that she will retire September 1, 2016 after serving 20 years on the bench.  Carol was first elected in 1996 and re-elected in 1998 and 2006. Before serving in the judiciary, she spent more than two decades in private practice at two firms. She was, among other things, president of the Tennessee Judicial Conference in 2009-10 and presiding judge of the State Trial Courts from 1999 to 2001. Posted 5.3.16

Jackson W. Moore has been elected to be a member of the governing board for Vanderbilt University Medical Center. On the Vanderbilt Board of Trust, he is vice chairman of both the Executive Committee and the Governance and Board Affairs Committee and is a member of the Medical Center Affairs Committee and ad hoc Medical Center Study Group. Jack is principal of a private investment firm Moore Management and a longtime banking executive. Posted 9.28.15

William J. Chadwick of Malibu, California has been reappointed to the California Science Center Board of Directors, where he has served since 1999. Bill has been chairman and chief executive officer at Malibu Living since 2014 and managing director at Chadwick, Saylor and Company since 1985. He is also a co-founder of PREDEX Capital Management, a company that creates and manages real estate investment funds. Posted 6.22.15

R. Lee BennettR. Lee Bennett has been appointed to the Ninth Judicial Circuit Court Local Professionalism Panel for a three year term. Lee is a shareholder in GrayRobinson’s Orlando office and handles transactional matters for his clients including a variety of business contracts as well as trademark and copyright prosecution. Posted 2.18.15

 

 

 

Andrew Davis Coleman, 65, died April 8 in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1970, Andy graduated from The College of the Holy Cross and, one month later, married his high school sweetheart, Catherine Cronin. After earning his law degree from Vanderbilt, Andy settled in Cheshire, Connecticut, where he practiced for many years with the law firm of Hitt Mihalakos Sachner & Coleman and later, as a sole practitioner. In addition to his work as an attorney, Andy accepted an appointment from Connecticut Governor Ella Grasso in 1981 to the State Elections Enforcement Commission, where he served 14 years. He was active in the Cheshire Jaycees, served as president of the Cheshire Chamber of Commerce and was also active in the Cheshire Gridiron Club. After 38 years of practice, in 2011, Andy retired with his wife to their vacation home in Seabrook Island, South Carolina. Andy is survived by his wife, Cathy; their two sons; and a granddaughter. Posted 6-12-14

Brian T. Mahon was recently elected as the first vice president of the Connecticut state Probate Assembly. Brian is a founding partner of Mahon Quinn & Mahon as well as a probate judge. Posted 5-27-14

William J. Chadwick has been reappointed to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission by California governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. Bill has served the Commission since 2011 and served from 2001-08. He has been managing director at Chadwick Saylor and Co. since 1985. He is a member of the Exposition Park Management-California Science Center board of directors, where he served as chair from 2002-05 and from 2007-09. Posted 3.25.14

Richard H. Sforzini Jr. died on December 19. Upon his graduation from Auburn University and Vanderbilt Law School, he served as a Judge Advocate in the U.S. Air Force. Following his active duty service, he joined the Mobile, Alabama office of Sirote & Permutt where he practiced for many years and later served as managing partner of its Montgomery, Alabama, office as well. Most recently he practiced as an attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice in Little Rock. He was a member of the Florida, Alabama, Arkansas and Tennessee Bar Associations and was an active member of the Cathedral of Saint Andrew in Little Rock. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Flowers Sforzini; a daughter; and son, Richard H. "Hank" Sforzini III (M.Ed.'07) . Posted 1.13.14

George H. White, president of White & Polk, was named to the board of directors at Saint Thomas Rutherford Hospital. As a board member, George will work to support the objective and vision of the hospital and Saint Thomas Health. Posted 10.21.13

John G. Sestak Jr., a member at Jennings Strouss in Phoenix, has been appointed to the Phoenix Sister Cities board of directors. Phoenix Sister Cities focuses on developing and sustaining lasting, impactful relationships with cities around the globe. Jack is a transactional and litigation attorney. Posted 7.16.13

James BradfordJames Bradford is stepping down as the dean of Vanderbilt's Owen Graduate School of Management. Jim, who has led the program for eight years, will step down at the end of the academic year. Jim was also recently elected as the chairman of the board for Lebanon-based Cracker Barrel Old Country Store. Posted 1.31.13

 

 

 

 

Sam BartholomewSam W. Bartholomew Jr., who serves as of counsel for Adams and Reese in the firm's Nashville office, has been named the 2012 recipient of the Joe and Honey Rodgers Leadership Award from The Operation Andrew Group. Sam was honored at the organization's award dinner banquet at the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel with a reception September 10. Posted 9.14.12

 

 



Hugh C. Howser Jr. (BA '70)
has joined the office of Dickinson Wright as a member. With more than 30 years of civil litigation experience, Howser will focus his practice in the areas of labor and employment, construction, product liability, white collar and corporate law. Posted 8.7.12

John Fennebresque was elected vice chairman of McGuireWoods in December 2011. John is based in the firm's Charlotte, North Carolina, office. John was elected to a four-year term on the University of North Carolina Board of Governors in March 2011. Posted 2.20.12

R. Lee Bennett, a shareholder in the Orlando office of GrayRobinson, P.A., was awarded the Henry Cragg Volunteer Award, given to those who have gone above and beyond expectations in furthering the work of Junior Achievement-the world's largest organization dedicated to educating young people about business, economics and free enterprise. Lee focuses his practice on corporate, technology, trademark and copyright law. His diverse background and experience allow him to counsel business clients in negotiating commercial transactions as well as mediate business and transactional disputes. Posted 1.10.11

John RobbinsJudge John Robbins announced that at the end of his term in 2012, he will retire and not seek re-election to the Arkansas State Court of Appeals. When he retires, he will have served on the court for 20 years. John worked in private practice until being elected chancery judge for Judicial District 18-East in 1984. He served in that position until being elected to the District 4 position on the Arkansas Court of Appeals in 1992. Posted 10.17.11

 

 

 

Logan M. Hassig was elected President of The West Virginia Bar Association, which wasfounded in 1886 and is the oldest legal Bar in West Virginia and the 14th oldest Bar in the USA. Logan is The WVBA's 126th President. Posted 01.18.11

Barney James "Jim" Reeves died at his home on December 18th, 2010. He was 64. Jim was born in Chicago, Illinois, and after graduating from high school, he joined the United States Air Force, serving at the Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska, for four years. After serving in the military, he returned to Southern Illinois and completed his Bachelor's degree in Speech. After earning his J.D. at Vanderbilt, he worked with a large law firm doing private practice where his primary focus was corporate law. Later, he chose to return to military service, this time as an officer and attorney, in the Judge Advocate General Corps with the United States army, until 1977 when he moved to Las Cruces, New Mexico to spend the rest of his life. Jim joined attorney T.K. Campbell in 1978 as a partner in the Las Cruces law firm; which, from 1978 to December 2004, carried his name. During his legal career, Jim acted as a mentor, colleague, guide, and friend for numerous attorneys/judges throughout the state of New Mexico. He was rated by his peers as preeminent and received the highest designation as an AV lawyer, with the Martindale-Hubbell National Law Directory. He joined his wife, Edith Reeves in the formation of Reeves and Reeves in 2004. Jim is survived by his parents; three children; and four grandchildren. 

Jim Bradford, Emeritus Dean of Vanderbilt's Owen Graduate School of Management, was one of five Nashville businessmen honored in June by the American Diabetes Association as Father of the Year.The event was held at Loews Vanderbilt Hotel Nashville and benefited the American Diabetes Association. Posted 10.17.11

Judge John Robbins announced that at the end of his term in 2012, he will retire and not seek re-election to the Arkansas State Court of Appeals. When he retires, he will have served on the court for 20 years. John worked in private practice until being elected chancery judge for Judicial District 18-East in 1984. He served in that position until being elected to the District 4 position on the Arkansas Court of Appeals in 1992. Posted 10.17.11

Logan M. Hassig was elected President of The West Virginia Bar Association, which wasfounded in 1886 and is the oldest legal Bar in West Virginia and the 14th oldest Bar in the USA. Logan is The WVBA's 126th President. Posted 01.18.11

Barney James "Jim" Reeves died at his home on December 18th, 2010. He was 64. Jim was born in Chicago, Illinois, and after graduating from high school, he joined the United States Air Force, serving at the Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska, for four years. After serving in the military, he returned to Southern Illinois and completed his Bachelor's degree in Speech. After earning his J.D. at Vanderbilt, he worked with a large law firm doing private practice where his primary focus was corporate law. Later, he chose to return to military service, this time as an officer and attorney, in the Judge Advocate General Corps with the United States army, until 1977 when he moved to Las Cruces, New Mexico to spend the rest of his life. Jim joined attorney T.K. Campbell in 1978 as a partner in the Las Cruces law firm; which, from 1978 to December 2004, carried his name. During his legal career, Jim acted as a mentor, colleague, guide, and friend for numerous attorneys/judges throughout the state of New Mexico. He was rated by his peers as preeminent and received the highest designation as an AV lawyer, with the Martindale-Hubbell National Law Directory. He joined his wife, Edith Reeves in the formation of Reeves and Reeves in 2004. Jim is survived by his parents; three children; and four grandchildren. Posted 01.05.11

Carol McCoy, Chancellor, Part II, Davidson County Chancery Court, completed a term as 2009-10 president of the Tennessee Judicial Conference in June. She was the first woman to serve as Conference president. In 2009, she was honored wit the Tennessee State University Women's Center Women of Legend and Merit Award in the legal field. Posted 07.19.10

Charles "Charlie" Ray of Nashville, TN passed away suddenly on November 29, 2006 after suffering a heart attack while traveling to Kentucky. He was 65. A graduate of Vanderbilt University Law School, which he entered after working for several years as a baggage handler for American Airlines, Ray began his career in criminal law but also established a reputation as a civil litigator in employment law cases. According to Chip Frensley, his partner in the firm of Ray & Frensley downtown, Ray won one of the first age discrimination cases -- if not the very first -- in Middle Tennessee.

He often represented plaintiffs in such cases, but having been a law school classmate of Corrections Corp. of America co-founder Tom Beasley, Ray took on a number of labor-relations cases for the Nashville-based private-prison operator. In the highest-profile engagement, he represented CCA in Richardson v. McKnight, a case involving the legal immunity of the company's prison guards that reached the U.S. Supreme Court in 1997. Ray argued the company's case before the high court, which eventually handed down a 5-4 decision in favor of CCA's opponents.

Ray was lead attorney in a 2000 lawsuit against Vanderbilt University involving nine members of the Vandy women's track, field, and cross country team who charged the university with Title IX discrimination. Title IX, a component of the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program receiving federal funding. The case was eventually settled. Local attorneys polled by NashvillePost.com for a 2003 feature on the city's "best lawyers" cited Ray as one of the best criminal defense attorneys in town. One colleague called him a defender of "crimes in the streets, as opposed to crimes in the suites," while another termed Ray an "excellent defense lawyer."

Perhaps a higher distinction was what the late Federal Judge L. Clure Morton told a young colleague shortly before he died in 1998. Morton was a famously crusty curmudgeon; attorneys tended to approach his courtroom with some trepidation. But he called Ray the best lawyer who had ever practiced before him, and he said if he ever needed an attorney himself, Ray is the man he would call.

Ray took a sabbatical and moved to Ireland for a year and a half in the late 1990s. He retired from full-time practice at the end of 2004. Ray is survived by his wife Sandra, daughters Shannon Lumpkin and Lauren Arrigo, and three grandchildren.

Shelley Stiles passed away on April 4, 2006. He practiced law in the Nashville area for over 30 years.


Do you have news you would like to share or just want to let everyone know what you are up to these days? Submit your class note online, e-mail Grace Renshaw or call 615-322-2606.