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Edward K. Cheng

Hess Chair in Law

Ed Cheng's research focuses on scientific and expert evidence, and the interaction between law and statistics. Professor Cheng is a coauthor of Modern Scientific Evidence, a five-volume treatise that is updated annually, and he is the host of Excited Utterance, a podcast focusing on scholarship in evidence and proof. His articles, in which he explores evidence law from an empirical and statistical perspective, have been published in the Journal of Legal Studies, Yale Law Journal, and Stanford Law Review, among other prestigious law journals. He holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. in statistics from Columbia University. Professor Cheng teaches Evidence, Torts, and a seminar on Scientific Evidence, and is a seven-time winner of the Hall-Hartman Outstanding Professor Award for excellence in teaching. He was also selected by the graduating classes of 2013 and 2017 to be their commencement speaker.

Research Interests

Statistical approaches to evidence


Representative Publications

  • "Beyond the Witness: Bringing a Process Perspective to Modern Evidence Law," 97 Texas Law Review (forthcoming 2019) (with Alex Nunn).
  • "Detection and Correction of Case Publication Bias," 47 Journal of Legal Studies 151 (2018)
    Full Text | SSRN
  • Modern Scientific Evidence: The Law and Science of Expert Testimony, Thomson West (5 volumes, 2015-16 edition) (with David Faigman, Jennifer Mnookin, Erin Murphy, Joseph Sanders, and Christopher Slobogin)
  • "Reconceptualizing the Burden of Proof," 122 Yale Law Journal 1254 (2013)
    Full Text | SSRN | HEIN
  • "When 10 Trials Are Better Than 1000: An Evidentiary Perspective on Trial Sampling," 160 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 955 (2012)
    Full Text | SSRN | HEIN
  • "A Practical Solution to the Reference Class Problem," 109 Columbia Law Review 2081 (2009)
    Full Text | SSRN | HEIN
  • "The Myth of the Generalist Judge," 61 Stanford Law Review 519 (2008)
    Full Text | SSRN | HEIN
  • "Independent Judicial Research in the Daubert Age," 56 Duke Law Journal 1263 (2007)
    Full Text | SSRN
  • "Structural Laws and the Puzzle of Regulating Behavior," 100 Northwestern University Law Review 655 (2006)
    Full Text | SSRN
  • "Does Frye or Daubert Matter?: A Study of Scientific Admissibility Standards," 91 Virginia Law Review 471 (2005) (with Albert Yoon)
    Full Text | SSRN